Abstract # 154:

Scheduled for Friday, August 19, 2005 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: (Cambridge/Oxford Room) Poster Presentation


The effects of sedation on chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) behavior

C. Grassi, E. J. Glover and M. Vazquez
Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, Dept. of Comparative Medicine, PO Box 760549, San Antonio, TX 78245-0549, USA
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     Until recently, the behavioral effects of sedation on non-human primates have been little-studied. The goal of the present study is to perform a comprehensive behavioral analysis of chimpanzees under different sedation regimes. Two adult male chimpanzees were assigned to a protocol requiring single and repeated (within 48 hours) sedations. Behavioral analyses included: 1) After every sedation, data were recorded on recovery time (time required until socially capable) and time of food ingestion and 2) 30-minute focal animal observations conducted on each individual during baseline, protocol, and follow-up periods. Statistical analyses (e.g., ANOVA, Chi Square) indicated individual behavioral differences and were run separately on individuals. For example, one male took longer to recover from sedation (χ2 P < 0.001). That male’s recovery was not affected differently by repeated (n = 4) and single (n = 6) sedations, although the other male’s was (χ2 P < 0.01). Both individuals took longer to ingest fruit after repeated sedations (χ2 P < 0.01, P < 0.001). While these individuals differed in the proportion of time spent in activities such as resting, sleeping, sedation-related behaviors, and abnormal behavior during single sedations (F = 4.51, P < 0.05; F = 6.15, P < 0.05; F = 4.96, P < 0.05; F = 7.6, P < 0.01), they had similar patterns of these behaviors when compared across sedation type: single (n = 11) vs. repeated (n = 6) vs. none (n = 32). These data illustrate that individual physiology and behavioral patterns vary in response to sedation and that sedation does impact activity and feeding patterns of chimpanzees.