Abstract # 1047 Poster # 161:

Scheduled for Friday, August 19, 2005 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: (Cambridge/Oxford Room) Poster Presentation


EARLY REARING CONDITION AFFECTS ADULT CSF SEROTONIN METABOLITE AND PLASMA CORTISOL CONCENTRATIONS IN RHESUS MACAQUE (Macaca mulatta) MOTHERS

L. C. Guillory1, M. L. Schwandt1, T. K. Newman1, S. J. Suomi2 and J. D. Higley1
1LCTS/NIAAA/NIH, NIH Animal Center, P.O. Box 529, Bldg 112, Poolesville, MD 20837-0529, USA, 2Laboratory of Comparative Ethology, NICHD, NIH
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     Early rearing experiences can produce long-lasting differences in neurotransmission and hormonal functioning in primates. We investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the serotonin metabolite 5-HIAA and plasma cortisol levels as a function of early rearing in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) mothers before, during, and after separation from their infants. We tested the hypothesis that subjects reared for their first six months without mothers in either peer-reared (PR) or surrogate peer-reared (SPR) conditions would differ in CSF 5-HIAA and plasma cortisol concentrations compared to adult mother-reared (MR) mothers before, during, and after four 4-day social separations. Plasma and CSF samples were collected weekly before, during, and after the procedure for a total of eight weeks. As hypothesized, adult PR and SPR mothers had significantly lower CSF 5-HIAA concentrations than adult MR subjects during baseline, before undergoing separation from their infants (n = 92, P < 0.05). However, CSF 5-HIAA concentrations did not differ significantly between rearing conditions during or after separations. SPR mothers had significantly lower levels of plasma cortisol than adult MR or PR mothers after undergoing separations (n = 78, P < 0.05), but there were no differences between groups before or during separations. These results suggest the degree of stress associated with the measuring condition must be taken into account when evaluating the effect of early rearing condition on CSF 5-HIAA and plasma cortisol concentrations in adult female rhesus mothers.