Abstract # 1058 Event # 216:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 20, 2005 08:30 AM-09:00 AM: Session 16 (Crystal Ballroom) Oral Presentation


POPULATION DYNAMICS AND MONITORING OF THE ENDANGERED COLLARED BROWN LEMUR (Eulemur collaris) IN LITTORAL FOREST FRAGMENTS OF SOUTHEASTERN MADAGASCAR

M. Banks and E. R. Ellis
SUNY at Stony Brook, Department of Anthropology, SBS Building, Fifth Floor, Stony Brook, New York 11794-4364, USA
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     Baseline data on the population dynamics of the endangered collared brown lemur (Eulemur collaris) are surprisingly scarce in the primate literaturE. We attempted to fill this gap by using line transects to conduct censuses in some of the last, now greatly reduced littoral forest fragments in all of Madagascar during September 2000 – July 2001. Botanical plots were established for the purpose of illuminating relationships between lemur density and habitat conditions. Three Landsat 7, multi-spectral satellite images, covering a ten-year time span (1991, 2001, and 2002) and recent aerial photographs (2002) were incorporated into a regional GIS to examine patterns of forest loss since the advent of new conservation programs in the region. Densities for E. collaris were higher than recently-published estimates from other localities in two of the forest fragments surveyed while a third and more isolated locality was devoid of any primate species. Habitat conditions differed significantly across sites (Kruskal Wallis test: crown diameter: H = 31.47, n = 629, P < 0.001, tree height: H = 7.62, n = 628, P < 0.05, tree genus diversity: H = 8.49, n = 55, P < 0.05), yet conditions were not correlated with lemur population density. Biodiversity monitoring through a local infrastructure called the GCF (Géstion Contractuelle Forestière) in the area appears to have reduced patterns of forest loss in areas immediately accessible to local communities. However, more isolated fragments continue to be vulnerable to forest exploitation, logging and hunting. Partly supported by an ASP Conservation Small Grant.