Abstract # 16:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 18, 2005 10:45 AM-11:00 AM: Session 2 (Mayfair Room) Oral Presentation


SHORT-TERM GROOMING RECIPROCATION AND SEXUAL INTERCHANGE IN LONG-TAILED MACAQUES (Macaca fascicularis) IN TANJUNG PUTING NATIONAL PARK, KALIMANTAN, INDONESIA

M. D. Gumert1,2
1University of Georgia, Behavior and Neuroscience Program, Psychology Department, Athens, GA 30602, USA, 2American-Indonesian Exchange Foundation
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     Grooming in long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) is characterized by symmetrical exchange. Generally, social relationships are used to explain reciprocal grooming patterns, but short-term grooming reciprocation may still influence an individual’s proximate decision to groom. If short-term grooming reciprocation occurs, B should groom A more after A grooms B when compared to baseline and match control conditions. 10-minute focal samples and post-grooming samples were collected and analyzed on 38 adult and juvenile macaques. Additionally, 73 post-grooming samples were matched with control samples of comparable conditions. All variation in rate comparisons were made using independent groups t-tests and the matched control comparison was made using a Wilcoxon signed rank tests; both tested at P < 0.05. a baseline/post-grooming rate analysis was conducted for each individual. Differences in male-female grooming reciprocation were compared using this variation in rate method on 14 females and 5 males. Receiving grooming significantly increased the time proportion an individual groomed their partner. This was also found in the match control test. Grooming ones partner decreased after male-female grooming and increased after female-male grooming relative to baseline. Sexual activity increased after male-female grooming and decreased after female-male grooming relative to baseline. Male grooming may be a strategy aimed at receiving sexual behavior, not grooming. Grooming generally facilitated immediate reciprocation, but male-female grooming was not immediately reciprocated and instead was interchanged with sexual activity. Results suggest that grooming may promote short-term reciprocation and sexual interchange. Support: Fulbright Graduate Fellowship.