Abstract # 1097 Event # 24:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 18, 2005 10:40 AM-11:00 AM: Session 3 (Crystal Ballroom) Oral Presentation


INTEGRATING NON-INVASIVE BEHAVIORAL MONITORING WITH IN VIVO STRUCTURAL IMAGING AND POST-MORTEM STEREOLOGICAL STUDIES OF GREAT APE NEUROBIOLOGY

W. Hopkins1,2, C. Sherwoood3,4, J. M. Erwin4,5, D. Perl4,5 and P. Hof4,5
1Yerkes Primate Center, Div. of Psychobiology, Yerkes Reg. Prim. Res. Ctr., Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA 30322, USA, 2Department of Psychology, Berry College, Atlanta, GA, 3Departments of Anthropology & Biomedical Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH, 4Foundation for Comparative and Conservation Biology, Hagerstown, MD, 5VA-MD Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
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     Increasingly, non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques can be applied to investigation of relationships among behavioral processes, underlying brain morphology differences or changes, and comparative differences in central nervous system organization across primates. In vivo imaging offers many advantages for the study of brain-behavior relationships, but it provides only one level of analysis, and there are important practical and theoretical questions regarding the cellular structure and molecular mechanisms underlying brain morphology and behavior that require detailed stereohistologic analysis. Here we describe an ongoing effort to integrate studies on the behavior of great apes with individual differences in neuroanatomy as assessed using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and post-mortem studies of cellular organization. To demonstrate the strength of this approach, we characterize our efforts to quantify cerebral dominance at the behavioral, morphological, and cellular level in great apes. Comparative differences in the distribution of great ape handedness are demonstrated and these differences are mapped to species differences in brain morphology and potential cellular differences in the organization of various lateralized structures within the cerebral cortex.