Abstract # 137:

Scheduled for Friday, August 19, 2005 02:45 PM-02:50 PM: Session 12 (Crystal Ballroom) Oral Presentation


RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN PRIMATE GENOMICS: A SYMPOSIUM IN HONOR OF DR. LEO WHITEHAIR

J. Rogers1,2
1Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, Dept. of Genetics, Southwest Foundation, 7620 N. W. Loop 410, San Antonio, TX 78253, USA, 2Southwest National Primate Research Center
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     Over the past five years, there has been rapid progress in the study of primate genomes. The complete sequencing of the human genome has been quickly followed by draft sequencing of the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) genome. Projects are currently underway to produce whole genome sequence assemblies for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus). It is likely that other primate genomes will also be sequenced to a modest level of coverage. In parallel with whole genome DNA sequence analysis, researchers have developed new tools to investigate broad patterns of gene expression in various species, and begun to use genome sequences to search for evidence of past episodes of natural selection acting on specific primate genes. This symposium will bring together a series of five speakers who are actively working on the analysis of primate genetics and genomics. Speakers will present recent results of their comparative studies of primate genomics. Topics include the whole genome sequence of rhesus macaques, comparison of the human and chimpanzee sequences, large-scale analysis of gene expression in nonhuman primates, and genomic analysis related to the evolution of the brain.