Abstract # 13102 Poster # 84:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


SEASONAL STRESSORS AND HABITAT DESTRUCTION AFFECT THE FREQUENCY OF PARENTAL CARE AND PATERNAL ACTIVITY BUDGET IN SAN MARTIN TITI MONKEYS (PLECTUROCEBUS OENANTHE) OF PERU

S. Hodges
Texas A&M University, Department of Anthropology, College Station, Texas 77843, USA
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     Seasonal stressors affect general behaviors in primates, such as resting and traveling, but how they affect parental investment is uncertain. The current study examined how temperature and habitat destruction affected parental investment and activity level in San Martin titi monkeys. I predicted that parental care would be 1) negatively correlated with daily temperature range and 2) positively correlated with home range size, and that paternal resting would be 3) positively correlated with daily temperature range and 4) negatively correlated with home range size. To test predictions I collected 350 hours of infant care data, spanning infant ages 1 to 4 months, using instantaneous focal sampling on two wild P. oenanthe groups that had experienced different levels of habitat destruction. Data collection took place in the San Martin Region of Peru from July to December 2015 and August 2016 to January 2017. I measured daily temperature range in degrees Celsius using the average value of 10 to group data as low (<10) or high (10+). I evaluated predictions using chi-squared tests of independence in R version 3.4.3 [alpha=0.05]. All predictions were fully supported, with respective chi-squared values of 36.245, 358.25, 60.474, and 20.872 (all p<0.0001). Results show that seasonal stressors and habitat destruction reduce parental investment and increase paternal resting, and that their synergistic effects may further reduce parental care for groups experiencing greater habitat destruction.