Abstract # 13111 Event # 119:

Scheduled for Friday, August 10, 2018 10:15 AM-10:30 AM: (Chula Vista ) Oral Presentation


NON-INVASIVE EYE TRACKING FOR THE STUDY OF SOCIAL COGNITION IN LABORATORY-HOUSED MONOGAMOUS TITI MONKEYS (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS)

S. M. Freeman1,2, L. Loyant3, M. C. Palumbo1,2, T. Murai1,2, M. D. Bauman1,2 and K. L. Bales1,2
1University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, 3National Veterinary School of Toulouse, France
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     Primates acquire a wealth of social information through the visual system. Measuring eye movements allows researchers to study how individuals visually navigate their social world. We used non-invasive eye-tracking technology to quantify the social looking behavior of monogamous coppery titi monkeys at the California National Primate Research Center. The viewing tasks were voluntary: each monkey was presented with visual stimuli while sitting in a familiar transport box that was modified to include a small window at face height. First, we tested 19 animals (8 juveniles, 11 adults; 9 males, 10 females) with photos and videos of other titi monkeys. Fourteen animals (74%) participated and spent 26% of the session looking at the stimuli. Juveniles looked at the stimuli more than adults (t-test; p<0.03), and all monkeys looked at videos more than photos (t-test; p<0.02). We found no sex differences in looking time. Second, we wanted to determine whether pair-bonded adults recognize their partner’s face compared to unfamiliar faces. We tested 42 pair-bonded subjects with 10 sets of paired titi faces. We found that subjects had more fixations on their partner’s face (t-test; p<0.05) and vocalized more when looking at their partner’s face (t-test; p<0.01), compared to an unfamiliar face. Future studies will focus on oxytocin and vasopressin manipulations, which are known to influence social attachment and primate visual attention. NIH P51OD011107; the Good Nature Institute.