Abstract # 13114 Event # 30:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 11:45 AM-12:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Oral Presentation


THE VALUE OF LONG TERM DATA COLLECTION AND LIFE HISTORY TRACKING AND PRESERVATION: THE UNIQUE CPRC, UNIVERSITY OF PUERTO RICO MONKEY SKELETAL COLLECTION

D. R. Bolter1,2, J. E. Turnquist3 and T. B. Kensler3
1Modesto College, Department of Anthropology, 435 College Ave, Modesto, California 95350, USA, 2Evolutionary Studies Institute, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, 3Laboratory of Primate Morphology, University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, Puerto Rico
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     Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago remain a highly prized source for long-term studies, perhaps most known for research in behavior, psychology and disease. Since the 1950s individuals have been marked and census records kept, establishing demographic profiles and genealogies; and since 1971, systematic collection of individuals at death has occurred. Currently over 3,000 Cayo macaque skeletons are housed in the Laboratory of Primate Morphology, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus. Detailed databases maintain the individual’s age, sex, genealogy, parity, and some health history. Over four decades of accessions allow researchers to sample large scale species variations in female and male attributes, record maturity markers in the bones and teeth of known-aged individuals, investigate age-related changes in osteology, extract signatures of paleopathology in bones, explore heritability in skeletal traits, examine affects of locomotor behaviors on skeletons, and observe shifts in population-level features. With Hurricane Maria’s destruction, environmental resources have diminished on the island, foraging patterns have changed and unusual stressors have accumulated. Will there be observable effects in the long-term skeletal profile of the monkeys? The Cayo Santiago Collection provides a comparative framework for interpreting evolutionary and adaptive changes, with implications for understanding wild-collected museum specimens, and for analyzing fossil materials. This research expands the importance of the Cayo colony, and highlights the multi-faceted value of consistent long-term data collection during their lives.