Abstract # 13126 Event # 139:

Scheduled for Friday, August 10, 2018 02:30 PM-02:45 PM: (Chula Vista ) Oral Presentation


A NEW APPROACH FOR EVALUATION OF WALKING SPEED TO ESTIMATE BIOLOGICAL AGING AND EFFECTS OF AGING-DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRAMMING INTERACTIONS IN LAB-HOUSED BABOONS

H. F. Huber1, K. G. Gerow1, C. Li1,2 and P. W. Nathanielsz1,2
1University of Wyoming, 1000 E University Ave, Laramie, Wyoming 82071, USA, 2Southwest National Primate Research Center
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     Walking speed is an important human aging biomarker. We studied speed in a baboon model (Papio species) to determine if regression analysis combining speed and sex strongly predicts age. To determine whether walking speed can measure effects of developmental programming, the regression formula was applied to baboons exposed to maternal synthetic glucocorticoids (SGC). SGC are commonly administered to women threatening preterm delivery and have programming effects in offspring. We tested whether SGC accelerates aging in 67 female and 36 male baboons aged 5-22 years and 5 SGC-exposed males (11.5 years) whose mothers received SGC in late gestation. Each baboon was opportunistically timed with a stopwatch walking between landmarks 5-15 times by one observer. Regression formulas were developed to describe age, speed, and sex interactions. T-test analyzed chronological versus biological age in SGC males. The regression model for predicting age (A) from speed (S) corrected for sex (F; males coded 0, females 1) was A=24.32–0.1990S–2.3268F (p<0.001). All SGC males were below the normative regression line, with mean biological age accelerated 10% over chronological (p=0.05). These findings indicate walking speed is a valuable baboon aging biomarker given strong association with age, noninvasive nature, ease of measurement, and parallel human findings. Establishing speed and other biomarkers of aging allows assessment of biological versus chronological age and effects of developmental programming. Funding: R24OD010916, R24RR021367, R24RR025866, R24OD011183, P01HD021350.