Abstract # 13139 Event # 34:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 10:30 AM-10:45 AM: (Chula Vista ) Oral Presentation


PAIR HOUSING IN PIGTAILED MACAQUES (MACACA NEMESTRINA) FOLLOWING TRANSPORT TO A NEW FACILITY: EFFECTS OF TIMING

K. C. Baker1 and O. Pomerantz2
1Tulane National Primate Research Center, 18703 Three Rivers Rd., Covington, LA 70433, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
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     The transport of nonhuman primates between facilities is known to be a significant stressor. Also known are the buffering effects of social housing. However, not all facilities permit pairing during quarantine. This study evaluated the effects of housing during the first weeks of quarantine on body weight and behavior in 22 immature male pigtailed macaques transported to the Tulane National Primate Research Center. Fourteen subjects were placed into pairs upon arrival. Eight were paired after a 2-week delay. Body weights were recorded upon arrival and again 60 days later, and compared using a repeated measures ANOVA controlling for age. Behavioral data (165 h) were collected over the same period. Analyses compared levels of five categories of behavior over three two-week blocks, using univariate repeated measures tests following significant MANOVA controlling for age. Individuals introduced at arrival gained significantly more weight than those whose pairing was delayed (p<0.05). There was a significant interaction effect between behavior, time block, and housing. Abnormal behavior levels in the first block were lower in individuals paired at arrival (p<0.01), but did not differ once all subjects were paired. Anxiety-related behavior showed a trend toward lower levels during the first two blocks, and was significantly lower during the last block (p<0.05). This finding suggests that delays in pairing may result have more than ephemeral consequences on some indices of impaired welfare.