Abstract # 13146 Poster # 107:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


DYADIC DECISION-MAKING WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE BROADER SOCIAL GROUP IN CAPUCHIN MONKEYS (CEBUS [SAPAJUS] APELLA)

M. F. Smith and S. F. Brosnan
Georgia State University, Department of Psychology, PO Box 5010, Atlanta, Georgia 30302, USA
line
     Economics games have long been utilized to investigate strategic decision-making in humans and, more recently, non-human primates. While these studies have primarily looked at behavior within controlled dyadic pairs, real life decisions are often made within larger, more complex social groups, which may impact how decisions are made. In the current study, we looked at capuchin monkeys’ (n=5) responses to the Assurance Game (AG), when presented within a group setting. In the AG, subjects are given access to two token types; coordinating on Stag results in the highest payoff (4 rewards), while playing Hare results in a single reward regardless of their partner’s decision. In dyadic contexts, capuchins who develop a non-random pattern of play coordinate on Stag. Here, the group had a maintained supply of each token; if they returned tokens at the same time as a member of their group they were rewarded accordingly. After 15 1-hour long sessions, two subjects participated fewer than 50 times. The alpha male played almost equally often with the alpha female (947 trials) and her daughter (935 trials), who played less frequently with each other (235 trials). Among these pairs, there was no preference for any outcome (chi-squared tests: all p’s>0.05). We are currently extending this study to include other groups and additional games to better understand how social decisions are impacted by the social group.