Abstract # 13153 Event # 143:

Scheduled for Friday, August 10, 2018 03:45 PM-04:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Oral Presentation


FEEDING PATTERNS OF INFANT AND JUVENILE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACAQUE MULATTA) LIVING IN LARGE OUTDOOR CAPTIVE BREEDING GROUPS

J. K. Ramsey, M. E. Wilson, T. Meeker, R. C. Stavisky, K. Cummings, M. M. Crane, J. K. Cohen and K. Ethun
Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 2409 Taylor Lane, Lawrenceville, GA 30043, USA
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     Prior feeding studies of socially-housed young rhesus macaques have commonly involved food intake quantification methods with limited accuracy of individual consumption. Few data are also available regarding environmental and biological factors that may influence solid food consumption during infancy through the juvenile period. Here, we present longitudinal calorie intake data of free-feeding, rhesus monkeys (n=21 males, n=34 females) from 1-24mo of age who lived with their mothers in large social groups. Feeding data were generated from a commercially-available, computer-controlled feeding system that reliably records grams of chow pellets obtained in real-time by detecting microchips implanted in each hand of individual animals. The most rapid increase in daily caloric intake occurred during infancy through 16mo of age, then remained largely unchanged through 24mo of age. Beginning at 3mo of age (peak-lactation), males and females born to high-ranking dams consumed significantly more kcals per day than lower-ranking males (p’s<0.01). At 16mo of age, high-ranking males consumed significantly more kcals per day than all remaining groups (p’s<0.05). Preliminary hierarchical regression analyses reveal that other factors, including maternal food intake at peak lactation and birth timing (early vs. late in season), account for additional variance (9.6%) in daily calorie consumption of all offspring at 16mo of age (F(4,49)=14.98, p<0.001). These findings demonstrate that feeding patterns of growing rhesus monkeys are dependent on sex, social rank and other maternal factors.