Abstract # 13164 Poster # 95:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


LONGITUDINAL ASSESSMENTS OF COGNITION, STRESS REACTIVITY AND MOTOR FUNCTION IN AGING MARMOSETS

K. P. Workman, A. Le, B. Healey and A. Lacreuse
University of Massachusetts, Psychological and Brain Sciences, 135 Hicks Way, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
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     Cognitive abilities decline significantly with age in humans but whether age-related decline differs between men and women remains unclear. Studies in nonhuman primate models of human aging may help clarify this issue. The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is uniquely suited for longitudinal studies of cognitive aging, due to a relatively short lifespan (~ 10 years), sophisticated cognitive abilities and patterns of brain aging that resemble those of humans. We examined cognitive function, stress reactivity and fine motor function in male and female marmosets (age 4-5 at study entry) followed longitudinally for 2 years. Monkeys were tested on a serial reversal learning task (CANTAB, n= 22, 11 females), a test of stress reactivity (temporary social separation, n = 28, 14 females) and a fine motor task (Hill and Valley test, n = 23, 12 females). There was little evidence for a decline in cognitive flexibility or stress reactivity between the two time points. However, independent of year of testing, females took longer than males to reach criterion in reversal learning and were more reactive to the social stressor. A decline in motor function was observed in males, but not females, on the Valley test. Additional longitudinal points will determine whether these sex differences are maintained with increasing age. Supported by NIH grant # AG046266.