Abstract # 13177 Poster # 74:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


DO NOVEL MALES PREFER SOCIALLY CENTRAL FEMALES DURING INTRODUCTIONS OF BREEDING RHESUS MACAQUE (MACACA MULATTA) GROUPS?

K. L. Bailey1, B. Beisner2, S. Moss1, D. Hannibal2, M. A. Bloomsmith1 and B. McCowan2
1Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
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     Aiming to understand how male rhesus macaques integrate into new breeding groups of females, we examined males’ initial interactions with female social partners. We created social networks of affiliative behaviors (grooming, huddling, proximity) in three groups of females (N=77) prior to the introduction of new males (N=15) to determine the most socially central females in each group. Female groups were observed for 488 hours over six months and were analyzed for measures of “betweenness centrality” and “degree centrality” using a network modeling approach. We determined each male’s most frequent female mating and affiliation partners over a four-week, post-introduction period using rates of grooming, huddling, proximity, sexual solicitation, and mounting. We compared the males’ most frequent female partners with those females found to be the most socially central using t-tests. No pattern emerged in all groups combined (p>0.05), but when groups were individually analyzed there were differences. In one group, the females that males interacted with most frequently (aka ‘frequent’ females) had higher degree (t=-3.18, p= 0.004, alpha = 0.05) and betweenness centralities in grooming (t=4.36, p=0.02) and proximity (t=-3.49, p=0.005, alpha= 0.05) networks than ’non-frequent’ females. In a second group ‘frequent’ females had higher degree centralities (t=3.08, p=0.004, alpha =0.05) than ‘non-frequent’ females. These results provide some evidence that males may prefer more socially central females when establishing their place in a new social group.