Abstract # 13184 Event # 52:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 03:45 PM-04:00 PM: (Regency East 1 ) Oral Presentation


WHITE-FACE CAPUCHIN (CEBUS CAPUCINUS IMITATOR) RESPONSES TO PREGNANCY & LACTATION: WHAT ROLES DO THE GUT MICROBIOTA PLAY?

S. E. Webb1,2, J. D. Orkin1,2 and A. D. Melin1,2,3
1University of Calgary, Department of Anthropology & Archaeology, 2500 University Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, USA, 2Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, 3University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, Department of Medical Genetics
line
     Female primates employ strategies to address increased energy costs of pregnancy and lactation, including increasing energy intake, decreasing physical activity, or various physiological changes. Research has revealed the importance of the gut microbiota-microbes that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract-in shaping digestive processes, health, and energy acquisition. However, few studies have explored how gut microbial diversity might aid wild female primates in coping with increased energy requirements of pregnancy and lactation. To address this gap in knowledge, we used white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus imitator) to explore changes in gut microbial communities related to reproductive status. Between 2014-2016, 268 fecal samples were collected from 33 females and 11 males (to control insofar as possible for microbiota shifts due to diet and environment) at Sector Santa Rosa in Costa Rica. We sequenced the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene on an Illumina MiSeq, and used phyloseq for metagenomic analyses. Linear mixed effect models including arthropod consumption, rainfall, and fruit biomass (AICc = 272.7) substantially outperformed the null model (AICc=328.0, delta AICc = 55.39) as predictors of Shannon alpha diversity; however reproductive status did not have predictive value (AICc = 277.0; delta AICc = 4.36). These results suggest that capuchin gut microbial diversity (richness, evenness) remains stable throughout the reproductive cycle. Future analysis will examine the effects of reproductive status on the abundances of individual microbial taxa.