Abstract # 13185 Poster # 86:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


GUT MICROBIAL DIVERSITY OF BONOBOS (PAN PANISCUS) FROM LOMAKO FOREST, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO (DRC)

A. J. Hickmott1, D. M. Christie1, C. M. Brand1, M. L. Wakefield2, M. T. Waller3, F. J. White1 and N. Ting1
1University of Oregon, Department of Anthropology, 1218 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 , USA, 2Northern Kentucky University, 3Central Oregon Community College
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     The factors shaping variation in the community of microbes living in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of primates are complex. Increasing evidence suggests that GI tract microbe composition is influenced by factors like sex and social group. We describe the GI tract microbial community composition for 19 bonobos (Pan paniscus) from fecal samples collected at the Iyema camp, Lomako Forest, DRC. DNA was extracted from these fecal samples, 16S rRNA libraries were prepared, and sequenced on an Illumina NextSeq run. Raw sequence data were processed using the QIIME2 microbiome analysis package. The average frequency of Bacteria was 97.36% while the average frequency for Archaea was 2.64%. The most dominant phyla in the Iyema bonobos GI microbiota were Bacteroidetes (49.80%) and Firmicutes (32.27%). Consistent with previous studies on hominoid GI microbiota, rare taxa included Bifidobacteriaceae and Lachnospiraceae, however, no Bacteroidaceae were detected. These results are consistent with previously published results for bonobos GI microbiota. Bonobo GI microbiota beta diversity was not significantly different between sexes and social group membership. While larger sample sizes are needed to confirm, these analyses suggest that other factors like diet, seasonality, and stress need to be examined in depth for this taxon and other species to fully understand the multi-faceted influences on GI tract microbial communities.