Abstract # 13186 Poster # 81:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


MURAL PAINTINGS FOR THE BLACK HOWLER MONKEY CONSERVATION: NONFORMAL EDUCATION IN SOUTHERN MEXICAN COMMUNITIES

L. Jorge-Sales1, E. Sancho1,2 and M. Franquesa-Soler1,3
1Miku Conservación, A.C., Mérida, Yucatán, USA, 2Fundació Universitat de Girona, Girona, Spain, 3Instituto de Ecología A.C., Xalapa, Veracruz, México
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     The black howler monkey (Alouatta pigra), an endangered species endemic to Mexico, Belize, and Guatemala, can be considered as a flagship species for the forests of Southern Mexico. Community programs are fundamental for primate conservation purposes, where arts-based education can inclusively foster cognitive and emotional processes. In this project, a collective mural was made as a part of the follow-up stage of a larger conservation education program. The aim of the artistic intervention was to expand the relationship between the cultural and natural worlds with the black howler monkey as central icon, linking primate conservation with sustainable development goals and communities wellbeing. Mural paintings were shaped in 12 schools from 5 states of Southern Mexico, spending one week at each community. Creative hands from 1154 children (6-12 years old) and 132 adults (teachers, principals, school’s staff and parents) participated in both, the design and the performance of the mural. The methodology used was based on collaborative design emerged from a participatory process, and each design had its particular shape and color. During the whole process, place-based education took place through a crosscutting dialogue of knowledges. This approach helped to reinforce the learning reached in previous conservation education stages, and to strengthen the relationship with the community, establishing a broader conservation culture related to local concerns. Supported by ASP (1574) and Primate Conservation Inc (1430).