Abstract # 13189 Poster # 66:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


BEHAVIORAL RESPONSES OF OWL MONKEYS (AOTUS NANCYMAAE) TO CHEMICAL CUES OF POTENTIAL PREDATORS

 
 

C. K. Wolovich, M. Sliwa, G. Fils-aime and M. Blomquist
Florida Southern College, Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida 33801, USA
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Owl monkeys (Aotus spp.) are nocturnal primates that rely heavily on chemical and acoustic communication. Because they are small-bodied and socially monogamous, their responses to predators may differ from those of more conspicuous large-bodied diurnal primates that live in larger groups. To determine their responses to potential predators, we experimentally presented chemical cues (feces) of mammalian, reptilian, and avian predators as well as cues from non-predators (controls) to 12 captive groups of owl monkeys (A. nancymaae) at the DuMond Conservancy (Miami, USA). Foraging, space use and vocal and chemical signaling varied across treatments (FRIEDMAN TESTS, alpha = 0.05) and between the sexes (WILCOXON’S MPSR, alpha = 0.05). Reptilian and avian cues elicited the greatest behavioral responses. In the presence of reptilian predator cues, females spent more time foraging and less time in the nestbox than did males. Females urinated less often during reptilian predator trials than during control trials. During avian predator trials, females spent more time foraging than did males. Males emitted fewer chirps during these trials than during control trials. Males scent marked less frequently during mammalian predator trials than during pretrials. These findings suggest that owl monkeys may discriminate among chemical cues of different taxa and exhibit behavioral responses that would minimize their detectability. Sex differences in behavioral responses may relate to differences in energetic demand.