Abstract # 13205 Poster # 68:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


NEOPHOBIA IN CAPTIVE BROWN-TUFTED CAPUCHINS (CEBUS APELLA) CORRELATES WITH RANK ONLY IN THE PRESENCE OF THE GROUP

 

J. F. Berhane, M. K. Cochrane and R. P. Gazes
Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837, USA
line
     

Boldness is characterized as willingness to participate in risky behavior during novel or threatening situations. This personality trait can be stable and heritable, with individuals showing bold or neophobic behavior consistently over time. Individual differences such as dominance rank and age have also been shown to influence boldness. Previous results in wild tufted capuchins tested as a group found no relationship between rank and boldness, measured by latency to approach a novel object. An initial study of captive tufted capuchins in our lab suggested that higher ranking capuchins retrieve food from a novel object faster than lower ranking capuchins (R = -0.56, p =.046). However, while animals were tested alone, they could see other group members during testing, making it possible that the effect was driven by the presence of others rather than by stable individual differences in boldness. In the present study we tested the same subjects using the same paradigm but with the subject separated from the group. Results corroborate existing literature in capuchins suggesting that rank is not correlated with boldness (R = 0.16, p =.554). This suggests that audience effects influenced the behavior in our previous study and that boldness may not be consistent across all social situations. Follow-up studies on the impact of social relationships on these audience effects in the novel object approach task are ongoing.