Abstract # 13207 Poster # 105:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


MULTIPLE GROUP MODELING OF THE EFFECTS OF MALE AGGRESSIVE TEMPERAMENT ON LONGITUDINAL CHANGES IN AFFILIATIVE MAINTENANCE BEHAVIORS IN CAPTIVE COPPERY TITI MONKEYS

L. R. Witczak1,2, E. Ferrer1, M. Rhemtulla1 and K. L. Bales1,2
1University of California, Davis, Department of Psychology, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, California 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
line
     Interactions among newly-paired monogamous coppery titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) are highly unpredictable. Some pairs exhibit partner-directed aggression that occasionally leads to injury and separation. It is important to understand the relationship between aggressive temperament and affiliative interactions. We hypothesized that males exhibiting high levels of partner-directed aggression would spend the least amount of time in affiliation compared to those exhibiting no or low aggression. We identified male aggressive temperament using a Likert-type scale. We conducted spot-checks 5x/day for one year for 20 pairs, recording where partners were in relation to each other. We used multiple group growth curve modeling to determine whether male aggression significantly predicted trends in affiliation over time. Preliminary results suggest the mean intercept and slope significantly differ between pairs with high (n = 6), low (n = 8) and non-aggressive (n = 6) males (Chi-squared = 8.17, df = 8, p = 0.42; CFI = 0.995; TLI = 0.994; RMSEA = 0.06). High-aggressive males spend less time in affiliative contact with their mates and exhibit a decline in affiliation over time (Y[t]n = 0.257n + B[t]*0.027n + e[t]n). Non-aggressive males spend the most time in affiliation and increase in affiliation over the first year (Y[t]n = 0.366n+ B[t]*0.026n + e[t]n). These findings suggest daily recordings may predict which pairs may benefit from interventions aimed at increasing affiliation.