Abstract # 13216 Poster # 108:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


PAIR INDIVIDUALITY, NOT OFFSPRING RESPONSIBLE FOR DIFFERENCES IN AFFILIATION IN CAPTIVE COPPERY TITI MONKEYS (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS)

T. Franzetti1,2 and K. Bales1,2
1University of California, Davis, 1 Sheilds Ave., Davis, California 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
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     Titi monkeys are socially monogamous and form pair bonds with their partners. These pair bonds vary in strength and dynamic, similar to human relationships. Male titi monkeys exhibit high levels of paternal care, carrying offspring for about 88 percent of the time. Some accounts have noted that titi monkeys will choose their pair mate over their offspring, and will even abandon their infant to maintain their pair bond. This study examined levels of affiliative behaviors among 26 titi pairs by filming and scoring of over 100 hours of video. Generalized linear mixed model analyses found that levels of affiliation varied intensely among pairs, with high individuality among pairs (F=3.19, p<0.0001). The presence of offspring was found to have no effect on the affiliation between the pair mates (F=1.76, p=0.1745). Approach and leave data was also recorded for pairs still carrying infants (<4 months). As expected, there was no difference in number of approaches and leaves for males with and without offspring (approach: F= 0.59, p=0.4438; leave: F=0.04, p=0.8387). However, there was no significant difference in the behavior of the females either (approach: F=0.10, p=0.7585; leave: F=0.04, p=0.8330). This is curious, as previous studies have found that other family members tend to avoid a father carrying the infant. The next step in this project is to determine the factor that is causing the pair individualities.