Abstract # 13226 Event # 44:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 03:15 PM-03:45 PM: (Chula Vista ) Oral Presentation


HERITABILITY OF, AND RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN, VARIOUS BEHAVIORAL PHENOTYPES ASSOCIATED WITH ANXIOUS BEHAVIOR IN NONHUMAN PRIMATES

J. L. Cameron1,2
1University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychiatry, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA, 2Oregon National Primate Research Center
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     Nonhuman primates (NHPs) serve as excellent models for human psychopathology as they share many similarities in behavior, neuroanatomy, and genetics. To determine whether infant monkeys reared in a naturalistic setting could serve as useful models for the development of normally occurring childhood anxious behaviors, we adapted assessments designed to test anxiety in children. Between 3 and 6 months of age, 640 monkeys were given modified assessment that are routinely used to evaluate components of anxiety in children. As monkeys grew up each year further behavioral and physiological measures were made. Factor analysis revealed three factors related to anxiety (behavioral inhibition, reticence and impassivity), all of which were significantly heritable. Reticence (r=0.326, p<0.001) and impassivity (r=0.136, p=0.001) were significantly correlated with physical activity levels in infancy and remained correlated in adolescence, such that monkeys that were more reticent to explore and showed greater impassivity when confronted with novel or frightening stimuli were less active. Overall, we found anxiety traits were strongly associated with physiological correlates of anxiety (i.e., responsiveness to alcohol, CSF monoamine levels, heart rate and sleep), and thus represent important factors to consider when undertaking experimental studies to understand the etiology of human psychopathologies. Current work across the National Primate Research Centers is developing strategies to assess anxious behaviors in a standardized fashion so this information can be made available for future research studies.