Abstract # 13229 Poster # 83:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


WHAT DO CHILDREN THINK ABOUT MEXICAN PRIMATES’ CONSERVATION ISSUES? AN EXPLORATION IN COMMUNITIES OF SOUTHERN MEXICO USING PARTICIPATORY VISUAL METHODS

E. Sancho1,2, L. Jorge-Sales1, M. Llorente3,4,5 and M. Franquesa-Soler1,6
1Miku Conservación A.C., Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, 2Fundació Universitat de Girona: Innovació i Formació, Girona, España, 3Unitat de Recerca i Etologia, Fundació Mona, Riudellots de la Selva, Girona, Spain., 4Facultat d’Educació i Psicologia, Universitat de Girona, Girona, Spain., 5 Institut de Recerca i Estudis en Primatologia – IPRIM, Girona, Spain., 6Instituto de Ecología A.C., Xalapa, Veracruz, México
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     Unsustainable human activities are now the primary force driving primate species to extinction. If those pressures are not properly addressed, primate populations could disappear in the next 25-40 years. Applying education for the sustainable development in primate range countries is an important long-term activity to stimulate pro-conservation behavior. The present study involved a child-centered and child-led technique called participatory visual methods (PVM). We evaluated the perception and knowledge that 145 Mexican elementary school children (9-12 years old) have about environmental problems affecting Mexican primates. Specifically, we analyzed and categorized perceptions and knowledge from these children based on gender and geographic context (rural or urban). After the PVM activity, children were encouraged to create stories based on what they learned and shared with their partners. Besides, an indicator of children’s satisfaction towards the study design and method called “The dartboard of what I like and what I dislike” was applied. The results conclude that the context in which they live (rural or urban) influence on how they perceive the environmental problems discussed. The study highlights the value of assessing children’s perceptions with this inclusive methodology that promotes reflexivity and participation. Additionally, results from this study can be used to help policy makers and educational practitioners in fine-tuning educational, environmental, and outreach programs in favor of Mexican primates. Supported by ASP (1574) and Primate Conservation Inc. (1430).