Abstract # 13235 Event # 39:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 11:45 AM-12:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Oral Presentation


SOCIAL PARTNERS MITIGATE INACTIVITY LEVELS IN INTERMITTENTLY PAIR HOUSED ADULT FEMALE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

D. L. Hannibal1,2, L. C. Cassidy3, J. J. Vandeleest1,2, S. Semple4 and B. McCowan1,2
1University of California-Davis, Department of Population Health and Reproduction, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, 3German Primate Center, Gottingen, Germany, 4University of Roehampton, London, UK
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     Activity levels of captive primates can impact their weight management and welfare. Laboratory macaques may be continuously or intermittently pair housed for management or project reasons. We compared inactivity levels of 22 adult female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) that experienced these two pair housing conditions at the California National Primate Research Center. Subjects were in two groups: 1) twelve “I-C” females intermittently paired for two weeks, then continuously paired for three weeks, and; 2) ten “C-I” females continuously paired for two weeks, then intermittently paired for three weeks. GLM was used to assess whether intermittent versus continuous pairing, presence of enrichment, and pairing group (C-I versus I-C) affected time spent inactive. The best fit model for inactivity included only current pairing condition (continuous/intermttent). Inactivity was greatest when intermittently paired subjects were separated (Beta=21.84; P<0.001), and decreased when subjects were re-paired with pair-mates (Beta=-5.46; P=0.044). The decrease of inactivity, however, during the intermittent condition was less than the increase of inactivity when re-paired. Enrichment did not predict inactivity. Our results suggest female rhesus macaques become less active when separated from their pair-mate, but do not make up for this time when re-paired; enrichment did not mitigate inactivity in the absence of a social partner. Our results show social partners stimulate activity in pair-housed adult female rhesus macaques, and likely impact healthy weight management.