Abstract # 13245 Event # 46:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 04:15 PM-04:45 PM: (Chula Vista ) Oral Presentation


USING IN VIVO NEUROIMAGING TO STUDY INDIVIDUAL AND PHYLOGENETIC VARIATION IN PRIMATE BRAINS

W. D. Hopkins1,2,3
1Neuroscience Institute, Georgia State University, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Ape Cognition and Conservation Initiative, Atlanta, Georgia 30307, USA, 2Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 3Ape Cognition and Conservation Initiative
line
     Historically, the study of individual and phylogenetic variation in primate brains has relied on measures obtained from fixed post-mortem materials or histological approaches. In the past 40 years, there have been increasing development of in vivo non-invasive methods for imaging the anatomy and functions of the human brain. In this presentation, I present data on the application and use of in vivo anatomical and functional brain imaging methods in the study of primate brain evolution. This will include a brief summary of anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging methods, diffusion tensor imaging, and positron emission tomography. I further present a summary of methods used to characterize and quantify individual and phylogenetic variation in cortical organization including (1) region-of-interest (2) voxel-based morphometry and (3) cortical folding and gyrification. Many of these methods have greatly improved and enhanced comparative studies of primate brain organization and overcome limitations in previous approaches. Lastly, I briefly discuss how modern imaging methods can be used to test for brain-behavior-genetic associations across a wide variety of primate species.