Abstract # 13249 Event # 123:

Scheduled for Friday, August 10, 2018 11:15 AM-11:30 AM: (Chula Vista ) Oral Presentation


MATERNAL LITTER SIZE AT BIRTH PREDICTS INFANT MORTALITY WITHIN THE FIRST WEEK OF LIFE IN THE COMMON MARMOSET MONKEY (CALLITHRIX JACCHUS): A WOMB TO WOMB FRAMEWORK FOR NEONATAL LOSS

J. N. Rutherford4, C. Ross2, V. A. DeMartelly4, T. Ziegler3, L. Riesche5, L. Burke4, A. Steffen4 and S. D. Tardif1
1University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 S. Damen Avenue, College of Nursing, WCFHS (MC 802), Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA, 2Texas A&M University San Antonio, 3University of Wisconsin Madison, 4University of Illinois at Chicago, 5University of Pennsylvania
line
     Perinatal mortality is attributed predominantly to maternal health, an amalgamation of genome, current diet and lifestyle, current socioeconomic status, and racial and/or ethnic characteristics. Maternal health is also shaped by a female’s own early life development, reaching back to her fetal period, suggesting that maternal early life characteristics may help explain the large proportion of perinatal mortality not captured by current models. Marmosets are an ideal model for exploring developmental impacts on adult health as they produce litters, with triplets associated with poorer placentation, perinatal outcomes, and growth and metabolic parameters. We tested the hypothesis that mothers’ litter size at birth is associated with their offsprings’ risk of death within the first week of life, when they are dependent on maternal care. Fourteen adult female common marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) at the SNPRC were enrolled in the study, producing 42 pregnancies. Mothers who were triplets experienced a large increase in rate of neonatal deaths (Poisson-adjusted models: n=42, IRR[SE]=2.85[1.03], p=0.004). Neither maternal adult age nor weight predicted this outcome; offspring litter size and birth weight also did not predict survival. These findings suggest that maternal fetal development is a significant and independent driver of offspring development, with direct impacts on infants’ postnatal survival, which may be shaped by differential development of behavioral and/or physiological systems of maternal care. Funded by R01HD076018 (Rutherford, PI).