Abstract # 13255 Poster # 73:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 9, 2018 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Chula Vista ) Poster Presentation


GUT MICROBIOTA IN THE FULL GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT OF A RING-TAILED LEMUR (LEMUR CATTA)

 

Y. Zeng
1121 Church St, 403, 403, EVANSTON, IL 60201, USA
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Microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of herbivores are crucial for the digestion and absorption of nutrients. The spatial heterogeneity of the GIT allows a wide range of microbial communities to inhabit it. However, most studies are limited to describing the microbiota of the large intestine indirectly through fecal samples. Therefore, little is known about the microbiota in other areas of the GIT. Here, we use samples collected at necropsy to investigate the microbial community in the full GIT (stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and faecal) of a captive ring-tailed lemur in China. A combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing (V4 region) indicates that the microbiota of the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and faeces are distinct. The highest microbial diversity was detected in the cecum. Overall, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the three most abundant phyla. Clostridiaceae I (Firmicutes) has high cellulose decomposition potential and likely plays an important nutritional role while Citrobacter and Acinetobacter (Proteobacteria) are potentially pathogentic and detrimental to host health. Overall, this study improves our understanding of the microbial community in the GIT of the ring-tailed lemur, which may ultimately be useful for improving the care of both captive and wild populations of this endangered primate. However, additional data are necessary to fully describe the complex interactions of host and microbiota.