Abstract # 13282 Event # 184:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 24, 2019 10:45 AM-11:00 AM: (Room 309) Oral Presentation


YELLOW FEVER IN BRAZIL THREATENS SUCCESSFUL RECOVERY OF ENDANGERED GOLDEN LION TAMARINS

S. J. Hankerson1, J. M. Dietz2,3, B. R. Alexandre4, M. D. Henry3,5, A. F. Martins3, L. Ferraz3 and C. Ruiz-Miranda3,6
1University of St. Thomas, Saint Paul, MN 55105, USA, 2Save the Golden Lion Tamarins, 3Associação Mico-Leão-Dourado, 4Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 5Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Núcleo em Ecologia e Desenvolvimento Sócio-Ambiental, 6Instituto de Biociências e Biotecnologia, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense
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     The golden lion tamarin, Leotopithecus rosalia, is an endangered primate endemic to Brazil’s lowland Atlantic Forest. Centuries of deforestation and capture for the pet trade reduced the species to a few hundred individuals in isolated forest fragments 80km from the city of Rio de Janeiro. Intensive conservation action, including successful reintroduction of zoo-born tamarins, brought the species to about 3,700 individuals. In 2018, we determined that yellow fever in southeastern Brazil is killing golden lion tamarins. We surveyed tamarin losses in six forest fragments with populations of known sizes. We estimate an overall decline of 35%, and that 2,400 remain in situ. Tamarin losses were greater in fragments that were larger and had more core area and better forest connectivity. The future of golden lion tamarins depends on the extent of mortality in the current wet season, whether some tamarins survive the disease and acquire immunity, and development of a vaccine to protect the species against yellow fever.