Abstract # 13312 Event # 135:

Scheduled for Friday, August 23, 2019 04:00 PM-04:15 PM: (Room 325) Oral Presentation


IMPACT OF EARLY LIFE FATTY ACID SUPPLEMENTATION ON BODY COMPOSITION AND METABOLISM IN THE CAPTIVE COMMON MARMOSET (CALLITHRIX JACCHUS)

R. J. Colman, T. E. Ziegler, J. Adriansjach, K. Solonika and H. Ash
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, 1220 Capitol Court, Madison, WI 53715, USA
line
     Adolescent obesity is epidemic in the US and has both immediate and long-term health consequences including increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes with an increased likelihood of adult obesity. Like humans, captive common marmosets show diet-dependent early-onset obesity and dietary changes can have a pronounced impact. We are studying whether altering dietary fatty acid composition beginning in early life affects metabolic endpoints through adolescence and into adulthood in laboratory-housed common marmosets. Five-month-olds were divided into 3 mixed-sex groups: control (C,n=6), healthy (H,n=5) or unhealthy (U,n=7). Beginning at 6 months of age dietary fatty acid composition was modified through routine enrichment (C=no change, H=30% increase in balanced fat, U=30% increase in 1:2:1 ratio of saturated:monounsaturated:polyunsaturated fats). Repeated evaluations of body composition and glucose metabolism through 17 months of age were analyzed by ANOVA. As expected, body size increased (p<0.001) over time. While there were no overall sex or diet differences, weight and abdominal circumference increased more in H than C animals (p<0.05). An effect (p=0.009) of sex on glucose was also detected with females higher than males, though there was no evidence of metabolic dysfunction. No group or sex effect was found for A1C or glucose area under the curve calculated from an oral glucose tolerance test. A diet with additional healthy fat has led to increased growth rate compared to C animals.