Abstract # 13313 Poster # 111:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Alumni Lounge) Poster Presentation


SURVEY OF GASTROINTESTINAL PARASITES AMONG FOUR DIURNAL PRIMATE SPECIES IN THE GAMBIA

J. D. CRAMER1, S. G. SAPP2,3, Y. QVARNSTROM3, E. JARJU4, M. JALLOW4, M. ANTONIO5,6,7, E. FOSTER-NYARKO5 and R. S. BRADBURY3
1American Public University System, 111 Congress St., Charles Town, West Virginia 25414, USA, 2Oak Ridge Associated Universities, 3Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4Department of Parks & Wildlife Management- The Gambia, 5Vaccinology, Medical Research Council Unit The Gambia, 6Microbiology and infection Unit, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, 7Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
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     In The Gambia, urbanization, tourism, and resource extraction have led to habitat fragmentation and increased human-primate contact. This anthropogenic landscape has the potential for human-primate disease transmission, especially in tourist sites with well-habituated monkey populations that are often hand-fed despite prohibition. Over the last decade, primatologists have begun to broadly characterize primate parasite infections in these altered West African landscapes. In this study, we surveyed gastrointestinal parasites in four species of diurnal monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus, Erythrocebus patas, Papio papio, Piliocolobus badius) in The Gambia during the dry season in 2017 and 2018. Fecal samples (n=87) were collected during single day troop follows at 11 sites. In 2017, samples were stored in Total-Fix. In 2018, samples were stored in Total-Fix and 10% formalin to enhance parasite recovery. Fifteen different gut parasites (six nematodes and nine protozoa) were recovered. Most frequently seen were various intestinal amoebae such as Entamoeba spp. and Iodamoeba buetschlii. Papio samples were positive for 13 different gut parasites, Chlorocebus samples were positive for eight, Erythrocebus samples positive for ten, and Piliocolobus samples positive for six. At two sites where humans hand-feed monkeys and share restaurant dining areas, 11/13 samples were positive and included Dientamoeba fragilis and Blastocystis sp., both presumptively associated with human diarrheal illness. Future work will examine prevalence trends over time and characterize relationships between parasite richness and human proximity.