Abstract # 13325 Event # 64:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 03:45 PM-04:00 PM: (Room 325) Oral Presentation


PREVALENCE, INTENSITY OF INFECTION AND ABUNDANCE OF HELMINTH PARASITES OF WILD BROWN HOWLER MONKEYS (ALOUATTA GUARIBA CLAMITANS)

J. C. Bicca-Marques1, S. L. Jesus2, C. Calegaro-Marques2, V. F. Klain1 and Ó. M. Chaves1
1PUCRS/Escola de Ciências/Laboratório de Primatologia, Av. Ipiranga, 6681 Predio 12A, Porto Alegre, RS 90619-900, Brazil, 2UFRGS/Instituto de Biociências/Laboratório de Helmintologia
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     Primate-parasite interactions are often investigated via coprological studies given ethical and conservation restrictions of collecting nonhuman primates. Yet, these studies are inadequate to recover adult helminths for identification at lower taxonomic levels and to assess their prevalence, intensity and abundance of infection. Studying fresh carcasses of free-ranging individuals found in anthropogenic landscapes comes as a reliable alternative. In this study, we necropsied 32 brown howlers (17 adult males, 11 adult females and 4 juvenile males) that died (cause: domestic dog attack=10, traffic accident=9, electrocution=8, unknown=5) in Porto Alegre and Viamão, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, between 2013 and 2019. We found three nematodes (Trypanoxyuris minutus, Oxyuridae; Dipetalonema gracile, Onchocercidae; Parabronema bonnei, Habronematidae) and one cestode (Bertiella studeri, Anoplocephalidae). Prevalence was 3% for P. bonnei, 38% for D. gracile, 41% for B. studeri and 100% for T. minutus. Mean intensity of infection ranged from 5 in D. gracile and B. studeri to almost 50,000 in T. minutus. Mean abundance ranged from 2 in D. gracile and B. studeri to almost 50,000 in T. minutus. The low parasite richness and the helminths’ mode of transmission (direct: T. minutus; haematophagous arthropod vector: D. gracile and P. bonnei; intermediate host: B. studeri) are compatible with howlers’ folivorous-frugivorous diet. In the case of B. studeri, intermediate hosts are diminutive oribatid mites that might be ingested accidentally during leaf feeding.