Abstract # 13327 Event # 70:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 03:30 PM-03:45 PM: (Room 326) Oral Presentation


DOES SCENT MARK COMPOSITION DEMONSTRATE A RELATIONSHIP WITH FEEDING BEHAVIOR IN WILD COMMON MARMOSET MONKEYS (CALLITHRIX JACCHUS) IN PERNAMBUCO, BRAZIL?

C. L. Thompson1, K. N. Bottenberg1, A. W. Lantz1, C. J. Vinyard2, L. C. Melo3 and M. A. de Oliveira3
1Grand Valley State Univeristy, 1 Campus Drive, Allendale, MI 49401, USA, 2Northeast Ohio Medical University, 3Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco
line
     Many mammals utilize scent to communicate information about food resources, although this use of olfaction has received little attention in primates. Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) gouge trees to feed on exudates and regularly scent mark these holes. To assess whether scents placed on gouge holes relate to feeding behavior, we used portable GC-MS to characterize the chemical composition of marks (n=64) from wild common marmosets in Pernambuco, Brazil. We tested for relationships between the chemical richness (number of compounds present) and chemical variation (characterized via principal components analysis) of scent marks with measures of feeding behavior. Feeding or gouging preceded scent marking of holes in 96.9% of samples. There was a positive correlation between the chemical richness of scent marks and the number of revisitations to holes within 48hr (r=0.40, p=0.003). However, the principle component characterizing variation in chemical profiles was not significantly correlated with feeding visits to marked holes (r=0.21, p=0.163). Gouge hole volume, an indicator of use intensity, was significantly negatively correlated with the chemical richness of scent marks (r=-0.30, p=0.020) and chemical profile variation (r=-0.41, p=0.001). While these data show mixed results, they overall indicate the presence of some association between scent mark composition and feeding behavior. Although further work is needed to clarify this relationship, it does indicate that scent marking gouge holes could play a role in marmoset foraging behavior.