Abstract # 13328 Event # 61:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 03:00 PM-03:15 PM: (Room 325) Oral Presentation


DECLINE OF A PRIMATE COMMUNITY FOLLOWING A YELLOW FEVER OUTBREAK IN THE BRAZILIAN ATLANTIC FOREST

C. B. Possamai1, S. L. Mendes2,3 and K. B. Strier4
1Muriqui Institute of Biodiveristy, Caratinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil, 2Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo-UFES, Vitória-ES, Brazil , 3Instituto Nacional da Mata Atlântica – INMA, Santa Teresa-ES, Brazil., 4Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706, USA
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     We monitored the population demography of three primate species following a yellow fever outbreak in Caratinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil, at the Reserva Particular do Patrimônio Natural - Feliciano Miguel Abdala (RPPN-FMA), and compared to census data from 2015. Six expeditions were conducted at roughly 2-month intervals between May 2017-April 2018 to determine the size and composition of the surviving populations of brown howler monkeys (Alouatta guariba), buffy-headed marmosets (Callithrix flaviceps) and black horned capuchins (Sapajus nigritus). We obtained 243 records, n=105 of howlers distributed across 28 groups, n=7 of marmosets in 3 groups, and n=131 capuchins in 14 groups. Group size and composition for howlers ranged from 2-5 individuals, with 1 adult male, 1-2 adult females and 0-2 infants. Marmoset group sizes ranged from 2-3 individuals, age-sex classes could not be identified, and capuchin group sizes ranged from 4-14 individuals, with 1-2 adult males, 1-7 adult females, and 1-5 juveniles and infants of both sexes. Extrapolating from our sample area to the entire forest, we estimate population declines of >80% of howlers, >90% of marmosets and 40-50% of capuchins population, compared to 2015. These findings complement long-term demographic data on sympatric northern muriquis (Brachyteles hypoxanthus), and highlight the importance of long-term demographic data for understanding the variation in species’ responses to disease. Supported by National Geographic Society and Primate Action Fund-CI.