Abstract # 13337 Event # 65:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 04:00 PM-04:15 PM: (Room 325) Oral Presentation


EXPLORING THE FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO THE PERSISTENCE OF ALTERNATIVE BREEDING STRATEGIES IN A COOPERATIVELY BREEDING PRIMATE (LEONTOPITHECUS ROSALIA)

B. M. Frye1, S. J. Hankerson2, S. D. Tardif3, M. W. Sears1 and J. M. Dietz4
1Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634, USA, 2 University of St. Thomas, 3Southwest National Primate Research Center, 4Save the Golden Lion Tamarin
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Deciding where to breed often constitutes a critical component of reproductive success, but the factors mediating these decisions remain unknown for many taxa. For example, in species where dispersal is sex-biased, individuals sometimes opt to breed within natal territories. We explored how phenotypic quality, reproductive success, and demography intersect to shape dispersal decisions in golden lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia), a species in which both sexes vary in their propensity to disperse (28 females (Ndispersing=10; Nphilopatric=18) and 36 males (Ndispersing=26; Nphilopatric=10). Our results indicated that natal breeding may have disadvantaged females with regard to adult body weights (Welch’s t test: t=1.982; sd=34.115; D=0.686) and offspring survival (Cox Proportional Hazards Regression: RR (95% CI)=3.923 (1.871-8.228)), whereas philopatric and dispersing males were relatively similar in these metrics (t=-1.521; sd=34.848; D=0.539; RR (95% CI)=0.621 (0.331-1.165)). Multimodel inference using AICc indicated that breeding group size and population density also shaped dispersal decisions in sex-specific ways. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that males and females likely exhibited divergent dispersal strategies, which may have important implications for genetic structuring across populations and social dynamics.