Abstract # 13341 Event # 48:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 01:30 PM-01:45 PM: (Room 325) Oral Presentation


MULTILAYER NETWORK CENTRALITY IN RHESUS MACAQUE (MACACA MULATTA) NETWORKS IS INFLUENCED BY SEX, SOCIAL STATUS, AND FAMILY STRUCTURE

B. A. Beisner1, M. Posfai2, N. Braun2, J. Vandeleest3, R. D'Souza2 and B. McCowan1,3
1University of California Davis, 1089 Veterinary Medicine Dr., Dept. of Population Health & Reproduction, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Dept. of Computer Science, University of California Davis, 3California National Primate Research Center, University of California Davis
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     Social life is complex, and multilayer social network techniques have great potential to advance our understanding of this complexity by integrating information across multiple social domains. We validated a recently-developed approach for measuring centrality in a multilayer social network, called Consensus Ranking, by applying it to the social networks of a well-characterized nonhuman primate: rhesus macaques. Social networks were constructed for five interaction layers (i.e., aggression, status signaling, conflict policing, grooming and huddling) for seven social groups (N=620 subjects) for which 4-6 weeks of behavioral data were available. Multilayer consensus ranks were calculated across these five layers and analyzed with respect to individual attributes and socio-demographic factors (i.e., age, sex, social status, matriline size, and rearing history). GLMMS showed that multilayer centrality was greater in high-ranking males with high dominance certainty (rank × certainty × sex: p=0.03), females from the smallest and largest families (small vs. medium: p=0.004; small vs. large: p=0.91), and mother-reared individuals (mother vs. nursery-reared: p=0.03). Furthermore, examination of who occupied the top consensus ranks for each group revealed several unexpectedly important individuals (e.g. middle-ranking) and some unimportant alphas. Thus, variation in multilayer centrality reflected known patterns in rhesus macaques, such as the importance of high-ranking adult males across multiple social domains, and also revealed individuals whose social centrality and importance might otherwise have been missed in any single interaction network.