Abstract # 13342 Poster # 100:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Alumni Lounge) Poster Presentation


EXAMINING THE SOCIAL POSITION OF FEMALES PREFERRED BY NOVEL ADULT MALES IN CAPTIVE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

B. A. Beisner1, K. Bailey1,2, L. Young2, C. M. Remillard2, B. McCowan1,3 and M. Bloomsmith2
11089 Veterinary Medicine Dr., Dept. of Population Health & Reproduction, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 2409 Taylor Lane, Lawrenceville, GA 30043, 3California National Primate Research Center, University of California Davis
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Earlier analyses regarding novel males’ integration into breeding groups of females showed that some males preferentially affiliated with socially central females (Bailey et al. 2018, Abstract #74). This pattern, however, was potentially confounded by female estrus because the two male cohorts found to prefer socially central females were introduced earlier in breeding season than the cohort that did not. To better understand this relationship, we studied the introduction process of three additional male cohorts (cohort size: 3, 4, 5) which all occurred mid-breeding season. Affiliative (e.g., groom, sexual solicit) interactions between novel males and resident females were recorded via scan sampling to identify each male’s top three female partners. Females’ social centrality was assessed from grooming, huddling and proximity networks constructed from affiliation scan data collected prior to onset of male introductions. We calculated females’ centrality in each behavioral network and their multilayer network centrality (i.e., across all network layers). GLMMs fitted to the count of males preferring each female (N=45 females) showed that males preferred females that were central in the huddling network (b=2.5, p<0.001). Further analyses suggested that females’ multilayer centrality had greater impact on lower-ranking males’ choices than alpha males. Our results suggest that regardless of the timing of male introduction during breeding season, novel males prefer to affiliate and mate with the most socially central females in the group.