Abstract # 13357 Poster # 164:

Scheduled for Friday, August 23, 2019 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Alumni Lounge) Poster Presentation


A COMPARISON OF THE EFFICACY OF FORAGING TOYS FOR LABORATORY RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA): AN ACTIVITY-BASED USAGE ANALYSIS TO REFINE THE DELIVERY OF FORAGING OPPORTUNITIES.

B. N. Peterson and P. J. Pierre
Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, 1220 Capitol Court, Madison, WI 53715, USA
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     The goal of an enrichment program is to provide inviting interactive opportunities for animals to exhibit species-typical behaviors. One common strategy is to employ foraging toys that allow the animals to engage in extractive behaviors. The broad goal of this project is to refine our strategies for employing foraging toys that afford engaging and maintained active interaction. Eight singly-housed adult male rhesus macaques served as participants. We evaluated 7 common foraging toys presented in a random order, each for a 1-hour session. The toys were filled with a variety of food items, these items were consistent within each type of toy. A wristwatch activity monitor was attached to each prepared foraging toy. To begin each session, the observer set up a video camera in the room, placed devices on the cage, and returned after 1 hour. Each session was video recorded to verify manipulative interaction. An ANOVA showed that using an activity monitor can distinguish activity signatures for different toy types based on interaction [F(6,49)=2.94, p=.01] and that this method effectively serves as an efficient method to evaluate toys on a large scale. Ongoing replication, within-session and video analysis of manual manipulation patterns will continue to determine how device affordances can be modified to extend the duration of interaction with foraging toys. Supported by NIH grant P51OD011106.