Abstract # 13364 Event # 36:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 11:30 AM-11:45 AM: (Room 326) Oral Presentation


ASSESSING VARIABILITY IN AFFILIATIVE MAINTENANCE BEHAVIORS IN CAPTIVE COPPERY TITI MONKEYS USING LONGITUDINAL DATA

L. R. Witczak1,2, E. Ferrer1, M. Rhemtulla1 and K. L. Bales1,2
1University of California, Davis, Department of Psychology, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
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     Coppery titi monkeys (Plecturocebus cupreus) maintain pair bonds through behavioral synchrony. Findings from a previous study suggest male aggressive temperament predicts lower levels of affiliation across the first year of pairing. The present study investigates causes of change in affiliation over time. We hypothesized that affiliation varies at the dyadic level, pregnancy predicts increased affiliation, presence of an infant predicts decreased affiliation, and pairing experience predicts affiliation in subsequent pairings. We conducted pair affiliation scan samples 5x/day for one year for 29 pairs. We used nonlinear mixed-effects effects modeling to test whether dyads varied in their starting affiliation, peak affiliation, and peak affiliation timing. Our results show dyad-level variation across all three random effects (Chi-squared=33, df=3, p<.001). We then assessed effects of dyad-level time-varying predictors. Pregnancy predicted higher levels of affiliation (B=0.005, SE=0.007, t=7.10, p<.001), whereas the presence of an infant predicted lower levels of affiliation (B=-0.004, SE=0.008, t=-5.05, p<.001). We then investigated patterns of affiliation across pairings. Multiple-group growth curve analyses suggest the mean intercept differs between a male’s first pairing (i=0.308, SE=0.023, p<.001) and his second pairing (i=0.402, SE=0.008, p<.001; Chi-squared=12.35, df=11, p=0.34; CFI=0.953; TLI=0.974; RMSEA=0.11). Overall, males spend less time in affiliative contact with their first partner than their second partner. This study suggests temperament and pairing experience predict initial affiliation levels while pregnancy and parenting predict variation in affiliation over time.