Abstract # 13372 Event # 130:

Scheduled for Friday, August 23, 2019 02:45 PM-03:00 PM: (Room 326) Oral Presentation


QUALITY OVER QUANTITY: COMPARING FEMALE GROUP STABILITY MEASURES WHILE LIVING WITH TWO DIFFERENT MALE COHORTS IN RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

C. M. Remillard1,2, B. Beisner2, L. A. Young1, C. Long1, S. Moss1, V. Michopoulos1, A. Nathman2, B. McCowan2 and M. A. Bloomsmith1
1Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood RD NE, Atlanta , GA 30329, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center
line
     Previous research indicates that high ranking, non-natal adult males intervene most successfully in conflict among group members, leading to lower trauma rates and improved social stability. To determine whether a new male cohort would improve stability among a group of 14, mostly-unrelated females, we introduced 3 adult males including a socially experienced 14 year-old alpha. Females were previously housed with 7 young, less experienced adult males. Over 150 hours of scan sampling behavioral data were collected for affiliation behaviors and event sampling for conflict behaviors, before and after male introduction. We evaluated grooming network cohesion (percentage of all possible dyads grooming), rates of trauma, reproductive success, and rates of policing. Results showed improved female grooming cohesion (38% to 42%) and a 44% decrease in trauma, while reproductive success remained relatively constant (pre: 78.5% vs post: 71.4%). Female policing (interventions performed by third parties to control group conflict) decreased by 24.2%, becoming more balanced with the rate of male policing, which was accomplished almost solely by the new alpha male. These results suggest that a smaller group of new males in which the alpha is experienced and fully mature improved group stability. Data collection in other social groups is ongoing to increase the generalizability of our findings.