Abstract # 13374 Event # 212:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 24, 2019 01:15 PM-01:30 PM: (Room 309) Oral Presentation


A TEST OF THE MUTUAL BENEFIT OF ASSOCIATION HYPOTHESIS FOR MAINTAINING COLOR VISION POLYMORPHISMS IN WILD WHITE-FACED CAPUCHINS

E. K. Mallott1, M. L. Bergstrom2, S. Kawamura3, L. M. Fedigan2 and A. D. Melin2,4
1Northwestern University, Department of Anthropology, Evanston, IL 60208, USA, 2Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, T2N 4N1, Canada, 3Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8562, Japan, 4Department of Medical Genetics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, T2N 4N1, Canada
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     White-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) exhibit an X-linked color vision polymorphism. While there is a strong signal of balancing selection maintaining variation of the opsin gene, the specific selective process by which by which different phenotypes are maintained in populations are debated. In this study, we test the mutual benefit of association hypothesis – where having a mix of phenotypes in the population confers advantages to all individuals. We examine if dichromats preferentially forage for conspicuous (red-yellow) fruits near trichromats and if trichromats preferentially forage for cryptic fruits and insects near dichromats. Foraging data and the identity of individuals in close proximity were collected from adult female white-faced capuchins at Santa Rosa National Park (n=31) and La Suerte Biological Field Station (n=5) in Costa Rica. Fruits were classified as conspicuous (trichromats can distinguish chroma from the surrounding foliage), cryptic (neither phenotype can distinguish), or dark (both phenotypes can distinguish). OPN1LW opsin genotype was determined for all individuals. At Santa Rosa, dichromats and trichromats initiated proximity with trichromats at similar frequencies when foraging for conspicuous (LME, F=0.553, p=0.458), cryptic (LME, F=0.843, p=0.361), or dark fruits (LME, F=1.34, p=0.26). Additional analyses of the LSBFS dataset as well as invertebrate foraging contexts are planned. However, the current data do not support the mutual benefit of association hypothesis in fruit foraging contexts, and other selective processes may be more influential.