Abstract # 13381 Event # 178:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 24, 2019 10:30 AM-10:45 AM: (Room 313) Symposium


ONE ROOM WITH MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTS: HOW CAGE LOCATION WITHIN A ROOM AFFECTS THE BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLGICAL WELLBEING OF LAB-HOUSED RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA)

D. H. Gottlieb, A. J. Haertel, A. Maier and N. D. Robertson
Oregon National Primate Research Center, 505 NW 185th Ave, Beaverton, OR 97006, USA
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While the majority of cages are often similar, if not identical, within any given room at a primate facility, the environment and perspective of each cage in the room is unique. This is a direct artifact of primate facility room design, in which animal rooms typically have rows of stacked cages, often with a single door providing access to the room. With stacked cages, half the animals are in “top” cages and half have “bottom” cages, directly impacting an individual’s light exposure, visibility, relative position to caretakers, and ability to flee upwards from a perceived threat. With a single entrance to a room, monkeys in close proximity to the door are exposed to increased exterior noises and have increased frequency of exposure to human caretakers relative to animals in the back of the room. Using data from the Oregon and California National Primate Research Centers, we evaluated how cage location impacts the behavioral and physiological wellbeing of captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). We found that close proximity to the door, as well as being housed in a bottom cage, lead to negative welfare outcomes, including but not limited to the expression of abnormal and self-abusive behavior, and increased time to resolution of clinical diarrhea. These findings can inform colony management actions to resolve these issues.