Abstract # 13389 Event # 186:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 24, 2019 11:15 AM-11:30 AM: (Room 309) Oral Presentation


PRESERVING PREUSS’S RED COLOBUS (PILIOCOLOBUS PREUSSI): AN ETHNOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF HUNTING, CONSERVATION, AND CHANGING PERCEPTIONS OF PRIMATES IN IKENGE-BAKOKO, CAMEROON

A. N. Hofner1,2, C. Jost Robinson3 and K. Nekaris4
1The University of Georgia , Athens , GA, USA, 2University of Georgia, 3University of Wilmington North Carolina , 4Oxford Brookes University
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     The futures of nonhuman primate species and human communities in shared landscapes rely on our ability to engage with and understand the complex histories and multiscalar aspects of human–animal relationships. We use the Critically Endangered Preuss’s red colobus (Piliocolobus preussi) as a case study to examine the important ways in which histories of multiscalar human–primate interactions play out in the village of Ikenge-Bakoko, Korup National Park, Cameroon. We contextualize ethnographic and catchment data from adult men (N= 32) and women (N= 31) within long-term diurnal primate monitoring datasets to better understand the relationships among hunting practices, local perceptions of diurnal primates, populations of P. preussi,and conservation management. Our data indicate a disconnect between local cultural definitions of Bhunter^ and Western assumptions as to the makeup and nature of this and other categories. We show that such contradictions can have negative outcomes for conservationists seeking to turn the science of establishing accurate off-take rates of prey species into practical management solutions. Using a single village as a focal point, we highlight the importance of an ethnoprimatological approach to understanding the intricate entanglements among conservation histories, subsistence strategies, and human and nonhuman primate lives. The application of Ethnoprimatology is critical for twenty-first century primatologists who must navigate conservation concerns while also acknowledging and valuing the experiences of the human communities living alongside the primates we study.