Abstract # 13404 Poster # 157:

Scheduled for Friday, August 23, 2019 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Alumni Lounge) Poster Presentation


HOW MANY NONHUMAN PRIMATES ARE IN RESEARCH IN THE US? ANALYSIS OF ANNUAL ANIMAL NUMBER REPORTS FOR REGISTERED RESEARCH FACILITIES

N. Rose, A. Brownell and A. J. Bennett
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53715, USA
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     In the U.S., basic and pre-clinical research and testing that involves nonhuman primates is subject to a range of regulations and requirements under federal law. Research facilities are required to provide an annual census report to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The reports are publicly available. There is no such requirement for licensed exhibitors (e.g., zoos, sanctuaries), thus a full analysis of nonhuman primates used for research cannot be performed from public data. Here we provide a basic account describing the number of nonhuman primates in a subset of research settings. Annual reports were downloaded from the USDA website. The total number of nonhuman primates in 2016 and 2017 were 71,188 and 75,825, respectively, an increase of 373 animals. Of the 10 states reporting the largest numbers, half reported decreases. Further analysis focused on the 27 facilities that account for roughly 75-85% of all nonhuman primates reported. Private companies, including contract research organizations (CRO) and pharmaceutical companies, accounted for 35-40% of animals. National Primate Research Centers accounted for roughly 25%, while academic centers accounted for roughly 13%, and federal facilities 6%. Together the analysis provides an overview of the number of nonhuman primates used in U.S. research. We also highlight some of the critical features of the U.S. reporting system that can lead to confusion about the number of nonhuman primates in research.