Abstract # 13408 Event # 56:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 02:00 PM-02:15 PM: (Room 326) Oral Presentation


WILL YOU STILL LIKE ME TOMORROW?: LONG TERM CHANGES IN SOCIOSEXUAL RELATIONSHIPS IN CAPTIVE MARMOSETS (CALLITHRIX JACCHUS)

S. B. Carp, M. J. Wulf, A. C. Mustoe and J. A. French
University of Nebraska at Omaha, 6001 Dodge St, Omaha, NE 68182, USA
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     The quality and content of encounters among primate pairmates are dynamic. However, key timepoints for changes in the quality and frequency of social interactions between mates are not well-known. In this study we tracked seven newly-formed male-female pairs of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) from introduction through six months of cohabitation. Behavioral measures were recorded during home environment interactions. We also conducted partner-preference tests at approximately 12 weeks post-pairing. Sexual behavior was influenced by pairing length (ANOVA:F5,30=4.16,p=0.005), with the highest frequency during the first and second months of cohabitation (all p<0.05). In contrast, both the time in proximity to pairmates (ANOVA:F5,30=3.04,p=0.025) and contact (ANOVA:F5,30=3.99,p=0.007) with their mate increased over time, with levels highest during the third and fourth months of cohabitation (p’s<0.05). Behavior during home environment observations did not predict partner preference (Pearson’s r:p’s>0.05). First, sexual behavior and affiliative behavior show distinct temporal patterns in marmosets. Second, affiliative behavior is highest several months into cohabitation, indicating that this might be a key timepoint in assessing the development and maintenance of long-term relationships in marmosets. Third, behavior in a partner preference test appears to measure a different aspect of a relationship from that measured by undistributed home environment observations. These results indicate the importance of considering both long-term temporal dynamics and social context when assessing the maintenance of social bonds. Supported by MH114504 and HD089147.