Abstract # 13410 Event # 37:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 11:45 AM-12:00 PM: (Room 326) Oral Presentation


NOT ALL GROOMING IS CREATED EQUAL: DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF POLITICAL VS AFFILIATIVE GROOMING ON CYTOKINES AND GLUCOCORTICOID BIOMARKERS OF HEALTH IN RHESUS MACAQUES

L. Wooddell1, J. Vandeleest1, A. Nathman1, B. Beisner1,2 and B. McCowan1,2
1California National Primate Research Center, Davis, California 95616, USA, 2Department of Health and Reproduction, University of California, Davis
line
     Grooming in nonhuman primates may be used to maintain social bonds and social cohesion and/or for tolerance and exchange for agonistic support. Grooming therefore can serve multiple social functions. However, to date, studies examining social grooming have typically combined all forms of social grooming into one analysis. We therefore tested the hypothesis that different grooming relationships (i.e., among family/friends vs. political among non-family/friends) may have differential effects on short and long term biomarkers of inflammation and stress (e.g., cytokines, hair cortisol). We predicted that friends/family grooming network metrics (closeness centrality) would be associated with reduced levels of these biomarkers, whereas political grooming network metrics (eigenvector/information centrality) would be associated with elevated levels. Consistent with our predictions, females with higher friend/family grooming centrality showed reduced levels of IL6 and TNF-alpha (beta = -1.61, p<0.001), while females with high political grooming centrality showed elevated levels (beta= 3.84, p<0.003). For hair cortisol, a similar yet more complex relationship was found that included an interaction with rank. Specifically, middle-ranking females with high political grooming centrality showed elevated hair cortisol (beta = 0.272 , p<0.02) but did not benefit from friends/family grooming networks. These results indicate that grooming is not a singular behavior that can be clumped into one category; indeed, different types of grooming relationships representing different social functions, can have very different, even opposite, effects on health.