Abstract # 13412 Event # 32:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 10:30 AM-11:45 AM: (Room 326) Oral Presentation


SOCIAL BONDS, PERSONALITY AND FECAL GLUCOCORTICOID METABOLITE CONCENTRATIONS IN FREE-RANGING JUVENILE RHESUS MACAQUES (MACACA MULATTA), CAYO SANTIAGO

K. C. Burke1, M. Heistermann2, J. Higham3 and C. M. Berman1,4
1Anthropology Department, University at Buffalo, Ellicott Complex, 380 Fillmore Academic Center, Buffalo, New York 14261, USA, 2Endocrinology Laboratory, German Primate Center, Leibniz Institute for Primate Research, 3Evolution Laboratory, New York University , 4Graduate Program in Evolution, Ecology and Behavior, University at Buffalo
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     Social support buffers the effects of stressors in adult primates, but we know less about whether juvenile primates also buffer stress socially. We collected behavioral data (total 644h, 11h/subject) and fecal samples (7.6/subject) over 5 months on 42 free-ranging juvenile rhesus monkeys (aged 18-35 months). Fecal samples were analyzed for glucocorticoid metabolites (FGCMs) using a previously validated enzyme immunoassay. We used linear mixed-models to examine relationships between mean FGCM concentrations, social network analysis variables and personality traits derived from principal component analysis. The results suggest that social relationships can be both sources of, and buffers of, stress. Males that had central positions in the contact network [t(14)=-3.28, p=0.01] and spent time near many others [t(14)=-3.26, p=0.01] had relatively low FGCM concentrations [t(14)=2.64, p=0.02], consistent with social buffering. Similarly, females that had playful personalities had lower FGCM levels [t(7)=-2.10, p=0.04]. However, juveniles that groomed many others for long durations [males: t(14)=2.78, p=0.01], had central positions in the grooming network [females: t(7)=2.63, p=0.03], or displayed high levels of behavioral stress indicators [males: t(14)=2.64, p=0.02], had significantly higher FGCM concentrations, consistent with social stress. Similarly, females that spent time near many others had high FGCM concentrations [t(7)=4.57, p=0.01]. As with human juveniles and adolescents, social relationships can be a source of stress, depending on types of interaction and the individual’s sex. Supported by Leakey Foundation.