Abstract # 13414 Event # 35:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 11:15 AM-11:30 AM: (Room 326) Oral Presentation


EMBRACES HAVE PREDICTIVE POWER IN THE MULTIPLEX NETWORK FOR INDEXING SOCIAL BONDS IN CAPTIVE COLOMBIAN SPIDER MONKEYS (ATELES FUSCICEPS RUFIVENTRIS)

E. R. Boeving1,2 and E. L. Nelson1
1Florida International University, Miami, Florida, USA, 2Florida International University
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     The field of network science has demonstrated that social relationships emerge from structural connections known as a social network. Relationships develop from social bonds across multiple behavior types, and are represented in a multilayer network called a multiplex. Spider monkeys engage in many dyadic affiliative behaviors including grooming and embracing. Previous studies have characterized these social behaviors, and examined networks separately using a monoplex approach. However, no study has investigated the predictive power of any monoplex network within a multiplex network. Here we tested the hypothesis that embraces, but not grooming, hold predictive power of social bonds in the multiplex network. Edge weights were calculated between dyads from 186 hours of observation of 15 captive Colombian spider monkeys. Data were collected from May to August 2015 at Monkey Jungle in Miami, FL. Network edge weights for embracing (r(4) = 0.93, p = 0.007), but not grooming (r(4) = 0.0046, p = 0.994), were correlated with top ranked multiplex edge weights, confirming our hypothesis. Our results suggest that grooming does not regulate social relationships in spider monkeys. Rather, embraces can be leveraged to accurately index social bonds. We suggest that network computation may be a powerful tool for testing traditional hypotheses about the functions of social behaviors in nonhuman primates.