Abstract # 13426 Event # 181:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 24, 2019 10:00 AM-10:15 AM: (Room 309) Oral Presentation


HOW DO PRIMATOLOGISTS INTEGRATE CONSERVATION OUTCOMES IN THEIR FIELD RESEARCH AND PUBLICATIONS?

M. Bezanson1 and A. McNamara2
1Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053, USA, 2University of Texas at Austin
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     Approximately 30% of primate species are critically endangered and 75% of primate species are in decline. We are therefore experiencing a narrow opportunity to make a difference in the conservation future of nonhuman primates. In this presentation, we focus on the degree to which field studies are focused on or discussing conservation outcomes. We searched a sample of odd years of 10,047 ASP and AJPA (due to availability) conference meeting abstracts from 2000-2017. We identified 1,463 field studies. Conservation-focused studies were relatively rare (12.2%). The majority of conservation studies focused on anthropogenic impacts (24.2%), human-primate encounters (13.2%), population status (12.9%), and education programs (7.6%). These results, in conjunction with published manuscripts and a survey of field primatologists suggest that primatologists engage with conservation projects in their work but these outcomes are not explicitly described in their publications. We suggest that primatologists describe the broader conservation impacts of their research even if the work is not conservation focused. We conclude by identifying the barriers that prevent field primatologists from submitting conservation-focused studies in top primatological and science journals.