Abstract # 13452 Event # 34:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 22, 2019 11:00 AM-11:15 AM: (Room 326) Oral Presentation


GROUP STABILITY IMPACTS MALE REPRODUCTIVE SKEW IN WILD WOOLLY MONKEYS (LAGOTHRIX LAGOTRICHA POEPPIGII) AT THE TIPUTINI BIODIVERSITY STATION IN AMAZONIAN ECUADOR

L. A. Abondano1,2, K. Ellis2 and A. Di Fiore1
1University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TEXAS 78712, USA, 2Miami University, Oxford, OH
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     Among group-living primates, male reproductive success is often skewed towards dominant individuals, but in species that lack clear male dominance hierarchies, paternities are expected to be more evenly distributed. Woolly monkeys live in multimale-multifemale social groups that are characterized by a promiscuous mating system and a lack of a clear dominance hierarchy among males. Although groups typically contain a single “large” adult male, distinguished by his exaggerated secondary sexual characteristics, females are observed to mate with all non-juvenile males. Using behavioral and genetic data collected since 2013, we investigated male reproductive skew in four groups of woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha poeppigii) in Amazonian Ecuador. Three of the four groups had the same “large” adult male throughout the study. However, in the fourth group male residency was unstable over time, and no clear “large” adult male was present. Although “large” adult males were not observed mating more frequently than expected, they sired more than two thirds of 26 offspring with genetically-determined paternity, and the group without a “large” adult male was the only one with no male reproductive skew. Our results suggest that male reproductive skew may be influenced by female choice for “large” males during their peak fertile period, but in groups where male residency is unstable and there are no “large” adult males present, female choice may not coalesce around a single individual.